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Operations 

Designed to Operate with Streamlined Crew 

Question
: How many people does it take to run a recycled water project that pumps millions of gallons of water a day, consists of four pump stations, a terminal tank and 41 miles of buried pipeline that course through three cities and nearly straight up a mountain? 

Answer: Only seven – if they are the skilled individuals who tend to the daily operations and maintenance of the Geysers Recharge Project.
Yes, only a small crew is required to operate the huge Geysers Recharge Project – which runs 24 hours a day, seven days a week. This is because the project takes advantage of state-of-the-art technology. Plus, the crew performs a rigorous schedule of preventive maintenance to ensure the project’s considerable assets achieve maximum operational reliability throughout their engineered lifecycle of over 50 years.

A technologically advanced computer system controls the flow of water the pump stations are handling at any given time and coordinates that flow with The Geysers Power Company to ensure they are getting the amount of water they need precisely when they need it. The system can also detect and alert the crew to any problems occurring along the pipeline or in a pump station. Emergency responses are built into the system, including automatic operation of the eight isolation valves that will close off pipeline operations within three minutes of an earthquake magnitude 5.5 or higher.

The multi-skilled crew not only monitors and maintains the technology that runs the project, they also service and maintain the project’s mechanical systems and make any necessary repairs.

On any given day, a crew member might be required to work on the highly pressurized pipeline or in cramped or confined spaces like valve vaults. That same day, crew members might inform pipeline neighbors about upcoming maintenance activities or “mark out” the location of the buried pipeline so that it is not punctured, or otherwise damaged, by construction or utility crews working in the area.

Another day might find the project crew coordinating operations with their counterparts at The Geysers Power Company. Or working with managers of the Audubon Sanctuary, which the pipeline passes through, to ensure certain project activities will not negatively impact the birds, plants or wildlife that live there.

Because of the advanced technology and the long-term approach to preventive maintenance, the system runs smoothly and without unplanned interruptions due to equipment or system failures.

InfoLearn more about the pipeline details.